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Martin Smith Lettings

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You're a landlord if you rent out your property, but before doing so their are a number of responsibilities that you need to undertake before letting your property. Martin Smith Lettings have over 25 years of experience letting properties and can help guide you through the process.

"I recommend Martin Smith Letting and Management because I am living in a house for nearly 10 years. I am very happy this is a amazing property in east London."

Mohamed Sameer Ismail

"I have been working with Tony for many years now. He's diligent and goes the extra mile. He has great relationships with tenants. He looks after all my properties and I would thoroughly recommend MSL to anyone."

Louise

"Renting and check out process is simple and efficient when compares with other big name real estate company. Response is fast when things need to be fixed. Gavin is exceptional while other staffs are also helpful."

Xin Li

"Started my 3rd year with them and never had a problem. All problems handled professionally and solved quickly."

Shamshad Ansari

"Very professional, understanding and good to do business with. Highly recommended."

Ian Bright

"Good agency. Employees are very helpful and understanding!"

Anish G

"Renting from past 2 years. Really good agency."

Iwona K

 

As a landlord you must do the following

There are different rules if you rent out property in Scotland or Northern Ireland.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) and your responsibilities

Your responsibilities as a landlord have not changed because of coronavirus. However, you should follow the government’s coronavirus advice.

Read the coronavirus and renting guidance for tenants and landlords. via visiting the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-and-renting-guidance-for-landlords-tenants-and-local-authorities  


Fire safety

It’s your responsibility to:

Health and safety inspections

The Housing Health and Safety Rating System (HHSRS) is used by your council to make sure that properties in its area are safe for the people who live there. This involves inspecting your property for possible hazards, such as uneven stairs.

If you own a property and rent it out, the council may decide to do an HHSRS inspection because:

  • your tenants have asked for an inspection
  • the council has done a survey of local properties and thinks your property might be hazardous

Why Choose Martin Smith Property Management?

Fully regulated Agency

Established over 25 years

Experienced and professional team

Members of Arla PropertyMark

HHSRS hazard ratings

Inspectors look at 29 health and safety areas and score each hazard they find as category 1 or 2, according to its seriousness.
You must take action on enforcement notices from your council. You also have the right to appeal enforcement notices.

The council can do any of the following if they find a serious hazard:

  • issue an improvement notice
  • fix the hazard themselves and bill you for the cost
  • stop you or anyone else from using part or all of the property

Financial responsibilities

If you only occasionally rent out your property or part of your home (for example through short-term rental apps), check if you need to tell HMRC about this income. via visiting the following link https://www.gov.uk/check-additional-income-tax

If you have a mortgage on the property you want to rent out, you must get permission from your mortgage lender.


Property Licensing

Owners of properties situated in an area designated for Property licensing must apply for a Private Rented Property Licence (PRPL), to be issued by the local Council.

Owners of houses classed as HMOs, which are a property rented out by at least 3 people who are not from 1 ‘household’ (for example a family) but share facilities like the bathroom and kitchen. It’s sometimes called a ‘house share’.

If you want to rent out your property as a house in multiple occupation in England or Wales you must contact your council to check if you need a licence.

You must have a licence if you’re renting out a large HMO in England or Wales. Your property is defined as a large HMO if all of the following apply:

  • it is rented to 5 or more people who form more than 1 household
  • some or all tenants share toilet, bathroom or kitchen facilities
  • at least 1 tenant pays rent (or their employer pays it for them)

Even if your property is smaller and rented to fewer people, you may still need a licence depending on the area. Check with your council.

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